Wednesday, July 11, 2007

Global money supply, and M3 data

Since we've been talking a bit about inflation and money supply growth lately (actually for some time now), I thought It might be useful to provide an easy to save reference link to some money supply data resources.

It's been somewhat difficult to gauge certain forms of money supply growth lately for a variety of reasons. Back in February of 2006, while discussing the outrage over the Fed's decision to stop reporting M3 money supply figures, I mentioned that this latest move away from accountability and transparency might create an added incentive for private economists and investors to reconfigure and publish the money supply data on their own.

Thankfully, this proved to be the case as outlets such as Nowandfutures.com and John Williams' ShadowStats.com started to provide their own reconstructed M3 figures.

There are even some sites which will tell you how to calculate M3 data
(with very close approximation) for yourself.

Now the only problem we have is finding global money supply data, which in some ways is a bit more difficult than it used to be.

However, thanks to the internet, it's also much easier to share the data once we've found it.

The Economist, which used to print a table of money supply growth in the back of their magazine, has relegated these figures to the Markets & Data section of their website.

Year-over-year growth figures in global money supply can also be found in a table updated monthly at Financial Sense Online's Market Monitor.

The OECD monetary aggregates are another source for money supply growth figures.

You can also find data on money aggregates at many of the central bank websites. This should provide a useful link for anyone seeking to find bank data and research at a national or global level.

Hope you found this to be a useful resource. Remember to save these links or bookmark this post for reference. And share!

1 comment:

jane said...

Amazing, really excellent info. Your blog is really cool. I bookmarked this and may come back again.

There is a lot of info on this Finance Trends Matter blog, very helpful information.

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